Download A Kiss for Little Bear by Else Holmelund Minarik PDF

By Else Holmelund Minarik

Little undergo is so happy with the image he has drawn that he asks rooster to take it to his grandmother. Grandmother is so proud of it that she sends him again a thank-you kiss.

How the kiss is handed from Grandmother, to rooster, to Cat, to Little Skunk, to woman skunk, and again to Little Skunk, and the way finally it comes back to rooster and at last to Little endure will satisfaction youngsters simply studying to read.

Else Holmelund Minarik and Maurice Sendak, the creators of the 1st Little undergo publication for starting readers, once more mix their outstanding abilities in a young tale full of heat and laughter.

This cherished vintage is an ALA remarkable kid's publication and a New York Times top Illustrated Book.

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Sample text

Later, when he reads over what he has written, he has trouble deciphering the words. Those he does manage to understand do not seem to say what he thought he was saying. ’s ‘aphasic’ episode here is figured as a slippage between his use of a word and what he meant it to mean. The result is a fall (like Adam’s) into a dizzying chasm of the same order A. experienced in the ‘wordless panic’ of his empty and lonely room. Elsewhere in ‘The Book of Memory’ A. is ‘hunched over a small rectangle of wood, concentrating on an even smaller rectangle of paper’, which he relates directly to his walks through foreign cities (Auster, 1982: 98).

Always comes before speech’ and, like the poet, they discover that ‘we do not find ourselves in the midst of an already established world, . . we do not automatically take possession of our surroundings’, but instead embark upon an ‘inscription of the visible into the brute, undeciphered code of being’ (Auster, 1997: 34–5). For Reznikoff, Auster and the characters of the Trilogy, the alienating urban experience must be translated into language before it can be deciphered. However, each needs first to fashion a vocabulary appropriate to the complexities of the metropolitan environment.

The streets of Paris, as I will show shortly, have undermined the Narrator’s stability and he now believes he has the power to change the world through a linguistic alchemy. These three linguistic predicaments resonate with Reznikoff’s poetics of urban representation. For our writer-detectives, too, ‘[s]eeing . . always comes before speech’ and, like the poet, they discover that ‘we do not find ourselves in the midst of an already established world, . . we do not automatically take possession of our surroundings’, but instead embark upon an ‘inscription of the visible into the brute, undeciphered code of being’ (Auster, 1997: 34–5).

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