Download Alternative Masculinities in Late Soviet Nonconformist by Olga Livshin PDF

By Olga Livshin

Throughout the overdue Soviet interval, many educators, scientists and newshounds believed that
traditional gender roles and norms had replaced, generating bodily or ethically vulnerable males and correspondingly robust ladies. the next learn follows the representations of this shift between Soviet nonconformist poets, writers and playwrights within the Sixties, Seventies and Eighties.
Social scientists have argued that those perceived adjustments have been defined of their time as
the results of demographic imbalance of fellows to girls or the deterioration of men‘s our bodies because of difficulties equivalent to alcoholism. against this, this learn indicates that during nonconformist literature, the past due Soviet gender challenge used to be a response to the Stalinist unitary version of the ―steeled‖ guy, as expressed in tradition and artwork. Authors articulated replacement versions of masculinity as a part of a bigger critique of Soviet, essentially Stalinist, civilization.
This dissertation analyzes the prose works of Venedikt Erofeev and Yuz Aleshkovsky,
the poetry of Genrikh Sapgir and Nina Iskrenko, and the prose and performs of Lyudmila
Petrushevskaya. How did those authors build male weak point and feminine power –
physically, mentally, spiritually, or as a mix of all 3 features? Did they decry these
changes or did they valorize them as possible choices to the Stalinist legacy of ―steeled‖ males? Did the authors position the accountability for the perceived emasculation of the Soviet guy at the nation or at the guy himself?

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Alternative Masculinities in Late Soviet Nonconformist Literature, 1958-1991

Through the overdue Soviet interval, many educators, scientists and reporters believed that
traditional gender roles and norms had replaced, generating bodily or ethically vulnerable males and correspondingly powerful girls. the next examine follows the representations of this shift between Soviet nonconformist poets, writers and playwrights within the Sixties, Nineteen Seventies and Eighties.
Social scientists have argued that those perceived alterations have been defined of their time as
the results of demographic imbalance of guys to girls or the deterioration of men‘s our bodies as a result of difficulties equivalent to alcoholism. against this, this examine indicates that during nonconformist literature, the past due Soviet gender predicament used to be a response to the Stalinist unitary version of the ―steeled‖ guy, as expressed in tradition and paintings. Authors articulated substitute types of masculinity as a part of a bigger critique of Soviet, essentially Stalinist, civilization.
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the poetry of Genrikh Sapgir and Nina Iskrenko, and the prose and performs of Lyudmila
Petrushevskaya. How did those authors build male weak spot and feminine power –
physically, mentally, spiritually, or as a mix of all 3 features? Did they decry these
changes or did they valorize them as choices to the Stalinist legacy of ―steeled‖ males? Did the authors position the accountability for the perceived emasculation of the Soviet guy at the kingdom or at the guy himself?

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31 Benjamin Sutcliffe echoes this point. He argues that Petrushevskaya‘s writing ―diverges from Bakhtin‘s conception of carnival owing to two key missing elements: ‗an authentically celebratory dimension‘ and a feeling of community (however temporary). ‖ See Sutcliffe, The Prose of Life, p. 62. 32 Connell, Masculinities, p. 46. 34 harmed or humiliated by the Soviet civilization. ‖ In this regard, the physicality of this literature not only provides a stark contrast to the grand, heroic, and utopian terms of Soviet Communist Party discourse, but also points a critical finger at men who have deeply absorbed Party rhetoric.

Barasch, ―The Grotesque as a Comic Genre,‖ Modern Language Studies 1(1985), p. 4. , p. 6. 72 On Bakhtin‘s function of the body in carnival, see Mikhail Bakhtin, Rabelais and His World, trans. Hélène Iswolsky (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1968), p. 19 and passim. 69 56 ―Icarus‖ juxtaposes several narratives—from ancient Greece, Stalin‘s time, and the Thaw. Sapgir‘s Icarus is a composite creature in a literal as well as metaphorical sense: he is part sculpture, part machine, part man. The splicing of several narratives concerning the nexus between men and technology is postmodern in the sense outlined by Linda Hutcheon.

78 The women lust after the machine/statue of Icarus because they are attuned to the Soviet myth of man-machine, as well as the time-honored traditions of Greek sculpture. The motif of a human being falling in love with a statue recalls another hallowed Greek myth – that of Pygmalion.

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